Roman Legionary Fortresses 27 BC--AD 378

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Roman Legionary Fortresses 27 BC--AD 378

Postby Marcus Minucius Audens » Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:36 am

>>>> Roman Legionary Fortresses 27 BC--AD 378 <<<<

>>> Duncan B. Campbell, Brian Delf (Illust.), Osprey Pub. 2006

In a period of time, from the Emperor Augustus (27 BC -- AD 14) onwards, the evolution of the Roman Army went from an emergency recruited reserve force for defence, to a standing military element with stable, heavy duty fortresses which were permanent and distributed, as needed, over the whole empire. In previous centuries, legions had been raised for a specific emergencies or campaigns and disbanded thereafter. However, these fortresses, were originally the temporary earthen strongholds of the legions who were fighting on campaign; and which then developed to finally become extremely elaborate stone fortifications which were structured and designed to withstand the measure of both time and weather, as well as, warfare against the Roman Empire. This text describes the design, and construction of the above fortresses all through the whole of the empire. Also, the experience of life within a standard type of fortification is reviewed in great detail.

>>> The Contents of this book is recorded below:

>>> Introduction;

>>> Chronology of the Roman Imperial Legions;

>>> -- The Design and development of legionary fortresses:

>> -- The Marching Camps of the Legions;
>> -- Legionary Fortresses under Augustus (27 BC -- AD 14);
>> -- “ “ “ Tiberius (AD 14 -- 37);
>> -- “ “ “ Gaius, Claudius, and Nero (AD 37 -- 68);
>> -- “ “ “ the Flavians: Vespasian & Titus (AD 70 -- 81);
>> -- “ “ “ the Flavians: Domitian (AD 81 -- 96);
>> -- “ “ “ Trajan (AD 98 -- 117);
>> -- " " " Hadrian (AD 117 -- 138);
>> -- “ " “ the Antonines: Marcus Aurelius, and Commodus (AD 161-192);
>> -- “ “ “ the Severans: Septimus Severus, and Caracalla (AD 193 -- 217).

>>> The Elements of a Legionary Fortress:

>> -- The Overall Layout of the Fortress;
>> -- The Defences;
>> -- The Headquarters Building (principia);
>> -- Other Buildings;
>> -- The Workshops (fabricae);
>> -- The Hospital (valetudinarium);
>> -- The Granaries (horrea);
>> -- The Baths (thermae).

>>> Living In a Legionary Fortress:

>> -- The Internal Structure of the Legion;
>> -- The Commander’s House (praetorium);
>> -- The Tribune’s Houses (domus);
>> -- The Barracks Blocks (centuriae);
>> -- The Problem of the First Cohort.

>>> Aftermath: the Legionary Fortresses In the Later Period:

>>> Further Reading:

>>> Glossary:

>>> Index:


>>> Reviewer’s Comments:

The book contains 35 black and white drawings and pictures, 19 colored pictures, and 9 colored Plates. I found the two maps very helpful in locating the described fortresses. The drawings of the Archaelogical drawings and pictures were very helpful in picturing the essence of the fortification designs, and then, of course, the colored plates which were finished drawings of the various aspects of the fortifications and their design were quite excellent, I thought. I value this book both for the information that it contains, as well as, for the great pictures and drawings that I can use in my own drawing training.

>>> References:

>> -- Boon, G. C., “Isca: The Roman Legionary Fort at Carlton, Mon,” Cardiff, National Museum of Wales, 1972;
>> -- Brewer R. J., “Roman Fortresses and Their Legions,” Cardiff National Museums and Galleries of Wales, 2000;
>> -- Kennedy D. L., “The Roman Army In Jordan,” Council For British Research In the Levant, 2000.

Respectfully Submitted;
Marcus Audens
Marcus Minucius Audens
 

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